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The Ultimate Guide to Professional Christmas Tree Flocking

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The Ultimate Guide to Professional Christmas Tree Flocking
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The Ultimate Guide to Professional Christmas Tree Flocking:- After visiting the local Christmas tree farm or digging up the synthetic evergreen in the basement, your Tannenbaum is ready for the tinsel-trimmed limelight. No embellishment can enhance your fir like a frosted flourish. While we can’t invite Mother Nature to sprinkle snow, there’s an elegant approach to add magic without ice and snow: Crowd it! 

The practice of flocking a naked tree in white synthetic powder gives it the appearance of a fresh snow dusting while keeping its natural appeal at a third of the cost of pre flocked trees. The best part? You can flock real or fake trees. Tree flocking, popular in the 1950s, is being reimagined.

Whether you want a white Christmas or to brighten up your (to-be) evergreen disco ball, we’ve asked the pros who’ve seen it everything, from gloopy imitation snow disasters to an unexpected indoor winter wonderland. Learn how to flock a Christmas tree the right way the first time with this guide.

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The Ultimate Guide to Professional Christmas Tree Flocking

Methods of flooding

  • Some flock their trees using soap shavings, shaving cream, and coconut, although flocking kits, sprays, and self-adhesive flocking powder are the most popular. For easy application, all three are advised, although powder is most popular.
  • A standard-sized tree needs 2.5–3 pounds of flocking. A tarp or drop cloth to protect your floors, goggles, gloves, a spray bottle, and a sifter (small and large for precision) may also be needed.

General precautions

  • According to Lovely Etc.’s Carrie Spalding, flocking a tree is messy, so use a tarp or drop cloth to protect your flooring. “Wear protective gear (goggles, gloves, a mask) and dust-prone clothes.”
  • In order to avoid breathing and ingesting fire-retardant chemicals from the powder or spray, she suggests working in a well-ventilated garage or outside.

HOW TO FLOCK A CHRISTMAS TREE

  • We recommend following these general suggestions to guarantee your tree turns out as desired, regardless of flocking kit, spray, or powder. At least three hours are needed to flock your tree.

Organize your workspace

  • Bring out your old sweats (flocking material doesn’t wash off) and set up your workstation with gloves, eye protection, and flocking material. At least three hours are needed to flock your tree.

WET THE TREE

  • Flocking powder requires tree-wide wetting. Should be misted, not soaked. This lets powder stick to the tree. Kim Morgan of Tidbits & Twine recommends filling a sifter half full with flocking powder to avoid clumping. Use a second, smaller sifter for precision.

FLOCKING POWDER

  • Sprinkle the sifter. Apply flocking from top to bottom, working on one area of the tree at a time. Start at the branches’ tips and work in. “Shake up and down, not left and right, to help keep the powder from falling over the sides of the sifter,” Morgan recommends. The amount of “snow” you add depends on the look you want. “That’s flocking powder’s beauty,” she says. “You control your desired look!” But start light until you get it. You can always add.

Also Read:-The Top 9 Outdoor Christmas Lights for Holiday Cheer

The Ultimate Guide to Professional Christmas Tree Flocking

The Ultimate Guide to Professional Christmas Tree Flocking

ADD MORE LAYERS

  • Layers make flocking appear fuller than throwing a lot on at once. Use a smaller sifter to access interior areas and touch up specific spots for more precision. Avoid obsession. You can flock your tree lightly to reflect freshly fallen snow or heavily to create a post-snowstorm impression. “Be sure to put your type A personality in check,” say Morgan. Remember that you’re mimicking nature, therefore not every branch must be perfect.”

REWET THE TREE AND GLITTER

  • After applying flocking powder, spray it down to help it stick to the branches. Only a small spray is needed. Before the flocking powder dries, add mica or glitter to sparkle.

DRY THE TREE

  • Let the tree dry out in a sheltered area for 24–48 hours. Touch the flocking to check for dryness. This material will stiffen. Fans on low can dry it. After drying, you can apply another coat.

Decorate the tree

  • Now comes the fun. Put it in the spotlight and add decorations. If flocking material falls off, wet and powder the area to reapply. Year after year, flocking can be touched up for customization.

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